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BAG Lectures

Special Lectures

2019 Lectures

Date: November 16, 2019

Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon

Venue: CME Auditorium - Medicine Building,University of Santo Tomas      

The Three Pillars of Language and Migration Studies: Positioning the Filipinos in Hawaii, USA

 

Dr. Rodney C. Jubilado

University of Hawaii at Hilo

Hawaii, USA

 

Interested participants should email english.department@ust.edu.ph.

Abstract

 

Early migration of the Filipinos to America was primarily caused by the colonization of the Philippines by Spain and by the USA. The earliest recorded history of Filipino presence in what is known today as the United States of America could be traced to the 17th century when the Philippines was still a Spanish colony, particularly during the period of Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade. The Spanish-speaking Filipino sailors established the shrimping villages (one is called Manila Village) in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana (Cordova, 1983, pp. 1-7).  Under the early American rule, the laborers in the sugar plantations of Hawaii and the pensionados formed the core of Filipino migration to the USA (Zong & Batalova, 2018). After the American colonial rule, the Filipinos are still migrating to the USA. As of 2017, there are 4,037,564 Filipinos in the USA, making them the second largest Asian group next to the Chinese (US Census Bureau, 2017). 

Generations later, we have now the Filipino-Americans who are (1) English monolinguals or bilinguals and heritage speakers of any of Philippine languages and (2) strong Filipino identities or totally mainstream Americans. Three Philippine languages are spoken widely in America in this order: Tagalog/Filipino, Ilocano, and Cebuano/Visayan, which is similar to the case in Hawaii. Focusing on Hawaii, it is alongside this background that this paper is written in attempting to provide a picture of what and who are the Filipinos from the perspectives of language, culture, and identity. In expounding this topic, I have made use of the lenses provided by the fields of heritage education (Kagan, Carreira & Hitchins Chik, 2017) and that of identity (Preece, 2016), and of migration (Canagarajah, 2017). The analysis presented herein is part of my greater research on the heritage education of the Filipinos in Hawaii that will be published soon. 

 

Bionote:

 Dr. Rodney C. Jubilado is a tenured Associate Professor and Chair of the Humanities Division at the University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hawaii, USA. He holds the degree of PhD in Theoretical Linguistics from the National University of Malaysia, and he speaks seven languages. He had been granted fellowships by the National University of Singapore and by Fulbright through the University of California Berkeley. He has spoken and presented research papers in Asia, Australia, and America. He has published various research articles in internationally peer-reviewed journals and in Routledge. He is a member of the following professional associations such as the Linguistic Society of America, Association for Asian Studies, Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast, American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Hawaii TESOL, Southeast Asian Linguistic Society, Linguistic Society of the Philippines, to name a few. 

2019 Lectures

Date: July 20, 2019, Saturday,

Time: 10 am.

Venue: De La Salle University

Linguistic Landscape as a Pedagogical Tool in Teaching and Learning English

 

Francisco Perlas Dumanig

University of Hawaii at Hilo

Hawaii, USA

 

Abstract

 

English language learning does not only happen within the four corners of the classroom, butit may occur even within the learner’s immediate community. Learning English can be enhanced through various resources like the availablelinguistic landscape. The term linguistic landscape (LL) is defined as the language of public road signs, advertising billboards, street names, place names, commercial shop signs, and publicsigns on government buildings combines to form the LL of a given territory, region, or urban agglomeration. As such, it contributes as an additional language learning tool to language learners. Examining the linguistic landscape as a pedagogicalresource in teaching and learning English provides opportunities for teachers and learners of English to make use of the available materials within their immediate community. Findings reveal that linguisticlandscape does not only provide awareness about the English language butit also enhances the learners’ English language skills. Such findings support the notion that exposing learners to the linguistic landscape provides awareness of the languages used in public signs which indicate or give evidence of what languages are locally relevant (Kasanga, 2012). This study offers new insights on how classroom activities canbe extendedto the streets of the learners’ community.

 

Keywords:English as a Foreign Language (EFL), English language teaching and learning, linguistic landscape, shop names, andsignage 

 

Bionote:

Dr. Francisco Perlas Dumanig is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hawaii, USA. He used to be a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and in other universities in the Philippines, Malaysia, Middle East, and the USA. He has done research on Language and Identity of Economic Migrants, English Language Teaching and Learning (ENL, ESL, and EFL), Language Planning   and Language Policy, and Southeast Asian Englishes.  His current research focuses on Family Language Policy of Filipinos in Hawaii, and Education and Language in the Philippines. He has published some of his works in peer-reviewed journals, such as Cambridge Language Teaching Journal, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, World Englishes, Multilingua, Language Policy, and   International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. His areas of expertise are Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language, Southeast Asian Englishes, Discourse Analysis (Language, Migration, and Identity) and Language Planning and Language Policy.